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Cold War Holidays

  • Kartonierter Einband
  • 304 Seiten
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Moving beyond traditional state-centered conceptions of foreign relations! Christopher Endy approaches the Cold War era relations... Weiterlesen
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Beschreibung

Klappentext Moving beyond traditional state-centered conceptions of foreign relations! Christopher Endy approaches the Cold War era relationship between France and the United States from the original perspective of tourism. Focusing on American travel in France after World War II! Cold War Holidays shows how both the U.S. and French governments actively cultivated and shaped leisure travel to advance their foreign policy agendas. From the U.S. government's campaign to encourage American vacations in Western Europe as part of the Marshall Plan! to Charles de Gaulle's aggressive promotion of American tourism to France in the 1960s! Endy reveals how consumerism and globalization played a major role in transatlantic affairs. Yet contrary to analyses of globalization that emphasize the decline of the nation-state! Endy argues that an era notable for the rise of informal transnational exchanges was also a time of entrenched national identity and persistent state power. A lively array of voices informs Endy's analysis: Parisian hoteliers and cafe waiters! American and French diplomats! advertising and airline executives! travel writers! and tourists themselves. The resulting portrait reveals tourism as a colorful and consequential illustration of the changing nature of international relations in an age of globalization. Zusammenfassung Focusing on American travel in France after World War II! Cold War Holidays shows how both the U.S. and French governments actively cultivated and shaped leisure travel to advance their foreign policy agendas. Endy reveals how consumerism and globalization played a major role in transatlantic affairs.

Klappentext

Moving beyond traditional state-centered conceptions of foreign relations, Christopher Endy approaches the Cold War era relationship between France and the United States from the original perspective of tourism. Focusing on American travel in France after World War II, Cold War Holidays shows how both the U.S. and French governments actively cultivated and shaped leisure travel to advance their foreign policy agendas.

From the U.S. government's campaign to encourage American vacations in Western Europe as part of the Marshall Plan, to Charles de Gaulle's aggressive promotion of American tourism to France in the 1960s, Endy reveals how consumerism and globalization played a major role in transatlantic affairs. Yet contrary to analyses of globalization that emphasize the decline of the nation-state, Endy argues that an era notable for the rise of informal transnational exchanges was also a time of entrenched national identity and persistent state power.

A lively array of voices informs Endy's analysis: Parisian hoteliers and cafe waiters, American and French diplomats, advertising and airline executives, travel writers, and tourists themselves. The resulting portrait reveals tourism as a colorful and consequential illustration of the changing nature of international relations in an age of globalization.



Zusammenfassung
Focusing on American travel in France after World War II, Cold War Holidays shows how both the U.S. and French governments actively cultivated and shaped leisure travel to advance their foreign policy agendas. Endy reveals how consumerism and globalization played a major role in transatlantic affairs.

Produktinformationen

Titel: Cold War Holidays
Untertitel: American Tourism in France
Autor:
EAN: 9780807855485
ISBN: 0807855480
Format: Kartonierter Einband
Herausgeber: The University of North Carolina Press
Genre: Politikwissenschaft
Anzahl Seiten: 304
Gewicht: 493g
Größe: H234mm x B156mm x T17mm
Jahr: 2004