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Fat and Mean

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Since the early 1980s, economic experts have recommended &quote,downsizing&quote, as the best way for U.S. corporations to... Weiterlesen
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Beschreibung

Since the early 1980s, economic experts have recommended &quote,downsizing&quote, as the best way for U.S. corporations to remain competitive. Reducing unnecessary staff would lower costs, increase profits, and transform these companies into lean, mean production machines. As many American businesses pursued this strategyoften in the wake of mergers and acquisitions that left them with an unwieldy layer of middle managementand raised their bottom line, it seemed the experts were right. Yet as David M. Gordon shows in this iconoclastic book, most of them have really only gone halfway. They are &quote,mean,&quote, but far from lean.Tracing the overall employment patterns of the past decade, Gordon shows that most American companies actually employ more managers and supervisors than ever before. These ever-increasing functionaries control company payrolls and pay themselves generous salariesat the expense of average workers. For despite a steadily growing economy the real wages of the American worker have been falling for the past 20 years. To explain this decline and the much-debated &quote,wage gap&quote, that resulted, pundits and professors invoke various causes ranging from the flow of production jobs overseas to the average worker's lack of the technological skills needed in today's &quote,knowledge economy.&quote, But Gordon exposes the single greatest factor in this decline, a corporate strategy that penalizes line workers and hinders businesses from competing effectively in world markets: the simultaneous overstaffing of management hierarchies and the inadequate compensation of workers.Instead of sharing profits with their employees, thus encouraging them to work harder, management has more often opted to prod workers by instilling fear of layoffs. Gordon unerringly plots the shortsighted and disastrous course of U.S. corporations, and documents the tremendous social and personal costs to their employees. Yet in addition to telling the harsh truth about downsizing, he suggests policies to ensure fairer business practices. Wages can increaseindeed, they mustas the economy begins to perform more efficiency.U.S. corporations have become fat and mean. They need to become lean and decentnot just for the sake of their workers, but for the sake of their competitive advantage. This provocative and original book shows how they can.

Autorentext

David M. Gordon is Dorothy H. Hirshon Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Economic Policy Analysis at the New School for Social Research. He is the author, with Samuel Bowles and Thomas Weisskopf, of After the Waste Land: A Democratic Economics for the Year 2000 and Beyond the Waste Land: A Democratic Alternative to Economic Decline. He lives in New York City.



Klappentext

Since the early 1980s, economic experts have recommended "downsizing" as the best way for U.S. corporations to remain competitive. Reducing unnecessary staff would lower costs, increase profits, and transform these companies into lean, mean production machines. As many American businesses pursued this strategy-often in the wake of mergers and acquisitions that left them with an unwieldy layer of middle management-and raised their bottom line, it seemed the experts were right. Yet as David M. Gordon shows in this iconoclastic book, most of them have really only gone halfway. They are "mean," but far from lean.

Tracing the overall employment patterns of the past decade, Gordon shows that most American companies actually employ more managers and supervisors than ever before. These ever-increasing functionaries control company payrolls and pay themselves generous salaries-at the expense of average workers. For despite a steadily growing economy the real wages of the American worker have been falling for the past 20 years. To explain this decline and the much-debated "wage gap" that resulted, pundits and professors invoke various causes ranging from the flow of production jobs overseas to the average worker's lack of the technological skills needed in today's "knowledge economy." But Gordon exposes the single greatest factor in this decline, a corporate strategy that penalizes line workers and hinders businesses from competing effectively in world markets: the simultaneous overstaffing of management hierarchies and the inadequate compensation of workers.

Instead of sharing profits with their employees, thus encouraging them to work harder, management has more often opted to prod workers by instilling fear of layoffs. Gordon unerringly plots the shortsighted and disastrous course of U.S. corporations, and documents the tremendous social and personal costs to their employees. Yet in addition to telling the harsh truth about downsizing, he suggests policies to ensure fairer business practices. Wages can increase-
indeed, they must-as the economy begins to perform more efficiency.

U.S. corporations have become fat and mean. They need to become lean and decent-not just for the sake of their workers, but for the sake of their competitive advantage. This provocative and original book shows how they can.



Inhalt

List of Figures

List of Tables

Acknowledgments

Introduction

PART I. CORPORATE BLOAT AND FALLING WAGES

1. The Wage Squeeze

2. The Bureaucratic Burden

3. The Stick Strategy

PART II. PAYING THE PRICE
4. Lives and Livelihoods

5. Values and Jobs

6. We Take the Low Road

PART III. TRIMMING THE BLOAT EASING THE SQUEEZE

7. Skills Mismatch or Globalization?

8. Wielding the Stick

9. Can We Take the High Road?

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Produktinformationen

Titel: Fat and Mean
Untertitel: The Corporate Squeeze of Working Americans and the
Autor:
EAN: 9781439136706
ISBN: 978-1-4391-3670-6
Digitaler Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM
Format: E-Book (epub)
Herausgeber: Simon + Schuster Inc.
Genre: Wirtschaft
Anzahl Seiten: 336
Veröffentlichung: 15.05.1996
Jahr: 1996
Untertitel: Englisch
Dateigrösse: 2.8 MB