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Chelmsford in the Great War

  • eBook (pdf)
  • 160 Nombre de pages
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Almost 400 men from the Chelmsford were lost in the Great War. This book explores how the experience of war impacted on the Town, ... Lire la suite
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Description

Almost 400 men from the Chelmsford were lost in the Great War. This book explores how the experience of war impacted on the Town, from the initial enthusiasm for sorting out the German Kaiser in time for Christmas 1914, to the gradual realization of the enormity of human sacrifice the families of Chelmsford were committed to as the war stretched out over the next four years. A record of the growing disillusion of the people, their tragedies and hardships and a determination to see it through. **The Great War affected everyone. At home there were wounded soldiers in military hospitals, refugees from Belgium and later on German prisoners of war. There were food and fuel shortages and disruption to schooling. The role of women changed dramatically and they undertook a variety of work undreamed of in peacetime. Meanwhile, men serving in the armed forces were scattered far and wide. Extracts from contemporary letters reveal their heroism and give insights into what it was like under battle conditions.

Informations sur le produit

Titre: Chelmsford in the Great War
Auteur:
EAN: 9781473855205
ISBN: 978-1-4738-5520-5
Format: eBook (pdf)
Producteur: Pen and Sword
Editeur: Pen and Sword
Genre: Histoire
Parution: 28.02.2015
Protection contre la copie numérique: Adobe DRM
Taille de fichier: 143.21 MB
Nombre de pages: 160
Année: 2015