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What is beyond the River?

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This book investigates the dialectics of power and social order in eighteenth and nineteenth-century M War al-Nahr from an intrins... Lire la suite
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Description

This book investigates the dialectics of power and social order in eighteenth and nineteenth-century M War al-Nahr from an intrinsic perspective. Relying on a rich corpus of Bukharan primary sources, the study is a work of fundamental research that combines established traditions of social historical research and approaches borrowed from the social sciences. The resulting narrative stretches from the Mongols and Abu'l-Khairids to the eighteenth century and the late Tuqay-Timurids, when the established spatial-administrative framework crumbled into an archipelago of petty Uzbek principalities, chiefdoms and 'city states,' continuing with the Manghits and finishing in the late nineteenth century with the colonial penetration. While beginning with a conventional bird's-eye view of steppe society worldviews and established patterns of authority, the author soon abandons the sole dynastic focus and comes up with a range of local histories. The reader will be acquainted with places like Nr, Shahr-i Sabz, Tirmidh, ir and other areas, which, having been dominated by competing military, religious and economic networks, remained partly outside the sphere of Tuqay-Timurid and later on Manghit authority. A large part of the book addresses the language employed in the chronicles by highlighting the semantics of key terms such as favor, loyalty or obedience. Those concepts are manifest in practices like patronage, mediation and gift exchange. Based on the materials of the Koshbegi Archive, the final part culminates in a range of micro-level studies of various socio-political domains in faraway villages and canal systems. Inspired by relational ideas of power, the analysis enhances our understanding of the factors that were decisive for social interaction in that period. Moreover, it gives fresh impulses to the debate on concepts of power and authority among historians and social scientists. This book investigates the dialectics of power and social order in eighteenth and nineteenth-century M War al-Nahr from an intrinsic perspective. Relying on a rich corpus of Bukharan primary sources, the study is a work of fundamental research that combines established traditions of social historical research and approaches borrowed from the social sciences. The resulting narrative stretches from the Mongols and Abu'l-Khairids to the eighteenth century and the late Tuqay-Timurids, when the established spatial-administrative framework crumbled into an archipelago of petty Uzbek principalities, chiefdoms and 'city states,' continuing with the Manghits and finishing in the late nineteenth century with the colonial penetration. While beginning with a conventional bird's-eye view of steppe society worldviews and established patterns of authority, the author soon abandons the sole dynastic focus and comes up with a range of local histories. The reader will be acquainted with places like Nr, Shahr-i Sabz, Tirmidh, ir and other areas, which, having been dominated by competing military, religious and economic networks, remained partly outside the sphere of Tuqay-Timurid and later on Manghit authority. A large part of the book addresses the language employed in the chronicles by highlighting the semantics of key terms such as favor, loyalty or obedience. Those concepts are manifest in practices like patronage, mediation and gift exchange. Based on the materials of the Koshbegi Archive, the final part culminates in a range of micro-level studies of various socio-political domains in faraway villages and canal systems. Inspired by relational ideas of power, the analysis enhances our understanding of the factors that were decisive for social interaction in that period. Moreover, it gives fresh impulses to the debate on concepts of power and authority among historians and social scientists.

Informations sur le produit

Titre: What is beyond the River?
Sous-titre: Power, Authority, and Social Order in Transoxiania 18th-19th Centuries
Éditeur:
Auteur:
Code EAN: 9783700180371
Protection contre la copie numérique: Adobe DRM
Format: eBook (pdf)
Producteur: Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften Verlag
Genre: Temps modernes jusqu'à 1918
nombre de pages: 1101
Parution: 10.08.2016
Taille de fichier: 3.4 MB