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Bad Foods

  • Livre Relié
  • 154 Nombre de pages
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Klappentext Bad Foods traces how the food nutrients fat, salt, and sugar have acquired negative reputations as well as the origins... Lire la suite
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Description

Klappentext Bad Foods traces how the food nutrients fat, salt, and sugar have acquired negative reputations as well as the origins of controversies and outright misconceptions of the dangers of these nutrients. It also explores confusion that can in part be attributed to biased media coverage about foods. Modern Americans are routinely bombarded with information about the health value of certain foods and the dangers of others. Frequently, health information about certain nutrients receives exaggerated coverage (e.g., dietary fat) while the importance of other nutrients gets ignored (e.g., vitamins and minerals). Moreover, the public is confused because health information about foods is often perceived as contradictory. While some readers may be startled by the authors challenge to sacred beliefs about foods, others will see honesty in his research and the writing and recognie the social benefits of examining our beliefs about foods. Zusammenfassung Bad Foods demonstrates how a variety of historical or political events and personalities have shaped our current views of good nutrition. On several occasions in American history concerns have arisen over the safety of our food supply (e.g., harmful ingredients in processed foods) and the potential that processing might deplete foods of their nutrients. These concerns help explain how food characteristics such as freshness, natural, organic, and unprocessed have become important to Americans. Bad Foods traces how the food nutrients fat, salt, and sugar have acquired negative reputations for health as well as any controversies and outright misconceptions of the dangers of these nutrients. Bad Foods also explores confusion that can in part be attributed to biased media coverage about foods. Modern Americans are routinely bombarded with information about the health value of certain foods and the dangers of others. Frequently, health information about certain nutrients receives exaggerated coverage (e.g., dietary fat) while the importance of other nutrients gets ignored (e.g., vitamins and minerals). Moreover, health information about foods is often perceived as contradictory. While some readers may be startled by what they perceive to be a challenge to sacred beliefs about foods, others will see the honesty in both the research and the writing and recognize the social benefits of examining our beliefs about foods. Bad Foods will be of interest to sociologists, food science specialists, and social historians. Inhaltsverzeichnis Acknowledgments 1. What's in a Name? 2. We Are What We Eat 3. The Fat is in the Fire 4. The Worth of One's Salt 5. Sowing Sugar's Bitter Harvest 6. Four of America's Legendary Favorites Conclusion Index ...

Résumé

Bad Foods demonstrates how a variety of historical or political events and personalities have shaped our current views of good nutrition. On several occasions in American history concerns have arisen over the safety of our food supply (e.g., harmful ingredients in processed foods) and the potential that processing might deplete foods of their nutrients. These concerns help explain how food characteristics such as freshness, natural, organic, and unprocessed have become important to Americans.

Bad Foods traces how the food nutrients fat, salt, and sugar have acquired negative reputations for health as well as any controversies and outright misconceptions of the dangers of these nutrients. Bad Foods also explores confusion that can in part be attributed to biased media coverage about foods. Modern Americans are routinely bombarded with information about the health value of certain foods and the dangers of others. Frequently, health information about certain nutrients receives exaggerated coverage (e.g., dietary fat) while the importance of other nutrients gets ignored (e.g., vitamins and minerals). Moreover, health information about foods is often perceived as contradictory.

While some readers may be startled by what they perceive to be a challenge to sacred beliefs about foods, others will see the honesty in both the research and the writing and recognize the social benefits of examining our beliefs about foods. Bad Foods will be of interest to sociologists, food science specialists, and social historians.



Contenu

Acknowledgments
1. What's in a Name?
2. We Are What We Eat
3. The Fat is in the Fire
4. The Worth of One's Salt
5. Sowing Sugar's Bitter Harvest
6. Four of America's Legendary Favorites
Conclusion
Index

Informations sur le produit

Titre: Bad Foods
Sous-titre: Changing Attitudes About What We Eat
Auteur:
Code EAN: 9780765802286
ISBN: 978-0-7658-0228-6
Format: Livre Relié
Editeur: Taylor and Francis
Genre: Santé, alimentation et bien-être
nombre de pages: 154
Poids: 363g
Taille: H229mm x B152mm
Année: 2003

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