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Hard-to-Survey Populations

  • Livre Relié
  • 676 Nombre de pages
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Informationen zum Autor Roger Tourangeau is a Vice President at Westat. Brad Edwards is a Vice President and Deputy Area Director ... Lire la suite
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Description

Informationen zum Autor Roger Tourangeau is a Vice President at Westat. Brad Edwards is a Vice President and Deputy Area Director at Westat. Timothy P. Johnson is Director of the Survey Research Laboratory and Professor of Public Administration at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Kirk M. Wolter is Executive Vice President, NORC at the University of Chicago and Professor, Department of Statistics, University of Chicago. Nancy Bates is a Senior Researcher for Survey Methodology at the U.S. Census Bureau. Klappentext Examines the different populations and settings that can make surveys hard to conduct and discusses methods to meet these challenges. Zusammenfassung Surveys are used extensively in psychology, sociology and business, and many other areas, but they are becoming increasingly difficult to conduct. This book provides the first systematic examination of the populations and settings that present unusual challenges, from Irish travellers to natural disasters, discussing methods to overcome these difficulties. Inhaltsverzeichnis Part I. Introduction: 1. Defining hard-to-survey populations; 2. Hard-to-survey populations in comparative perspective; 3. Measuring undercounts for hard-to-survey groups; 4. Counting and estimating hard-to-survey populations in the 2011 Census; 5. A review of quality issues associated with studying hard-to-survey populations; Part II. Conducting Surveys in Difficult Settings: 6. Disaster research: surveying displaced populations; 7. Conducting surveys in areas of armed conflict; 8. Interviewing in disaster-affected areas: lessons learned from post-Katrina surveys of New Orleans residents; 9. Reaching and enumerating homeless populations; 10. 'Where are our costumes?': The All Ireland Traveller Health Study - our Geels 2007-2011; Part III. Conducting Surveys with Special Populations: 11. Representing the populations: what general social surveys can learn from surveys among specific groups; 12. Surveying cultural and linguistic minorities; 13. Challenges to surveying immigrants; 14. Ethnographic evaluations on coverage of hard-to-count minorities in US decennial censuses; 15. Methodological and ethical issues arising in carrying out research with children and young people; 16. Challenges in the first ever national survey of people with intellectual disabilities; 17. Conducting research on vulnerable and stigmatized populations; 18. Surveying political extremists; Part IV. Sampling Strategies for the Hard to Survey: 19. Probability sampling methods for hard-to-sample populations; 20. Recent developments of sampling hard-to-survey populations: an assessment; 21. Indirect sampling for hard-to-reach populations; 22. Sampling the Maori population using proxy screening, the Electoral Roll, and disproportionate sampling in the New Zealand Health Survey; 23. Network-based methods for accessing hard-to-survey populations using standard surveys; 24. Link-tracing and respondent-driven sampling; Part V. Data Collection Strategies for the Hard to Survey: 25. Use of paid media to encourage 2010 Census participation among the hard to count; 26. The hard to reach among the poor in Europe: lessons from Eurostat's EU-SILC survey in Belgium; 27. Tailored and targeted designs for hard-to-survey populations; 28. Standardization and meaning in the survey of linguistically diversified populations: insights from the ethnographic observation of linguistic minorities in 2010 Census interviews; 29. Mobilizing hard-to-survey populations to participate fully in censuses and surveys; 30. Finding the hard to reach and keeping them engaged in research. ...

Texte du rabat

Examines the different populations and settings that can make surveys hard to conduct and discusses methods to meet these challenges.



Résumé
Surveys are used extensively in psychology, sociology and business, and many other areas, but they are becoming increasingly difficult to conduct. This book provides the first systematic examination of the populations and settings that present unusual challenges, from Irish travellers to natural disasters, discussing methods to overcome these difficulties.

Contenu

Part I. Introduction: 1. Defining hard-to-survey populations; 2. Hard-to-survey populations in comparative perspective; 3. Measuring undercounts for hard-to-survey groups; 4. Counting and estimating hard-to-survey populations in the 2011 Census; 5. A review of quality issues associated with studying hard-to-survey populations; Part II. Conducting Surveys in Difficult Settings: 6. Disaster research: surveying displaced populations; 7. Conducting surveys in areas of armed conflict; 8. Interviewing in disaster-affected areas: lessons learned from post-Katrina surveys of New Orleans residents; 9. Reaching and enumerating homeless populations; 10. 'Where are our costumes?': The All Ireland Traveller Health Study - our Geels 2007-2011; Part III. Conducting Surveys with Special Populations: 11. Representing the populations: what general social surveys can learn from surveys among specific groups; 12. Surveying cultural and linguistic minorities; 13. Challenges to surveying immigrants; 14. Ethnographic evaluations on coverage of hard-to-count minorities in US decennial censuses; 15. Methodological and ethical issues arising in carrying out research with children and young people; 16. Challenges in the first ever national survey of people with intellectual disabilities; 17. Conducting research on vulnerable and stigmatized populations; 18. Surveying political extremists; Part IV. Sampling Strategies for the Hard to Survey: 19. Probability sampling methods for hard-to-sample populations; 20. Recent developments of sampling hard-to-survey populations: an assessment; 21. Indirect sampling for hard-to-reach populations; 22. Sampling the Maori population using proxy screening, the Electoral Roll, and disproportionate sampling in the New Zealand Health Survey; 23. Network-based methods for accessing hard-to-survey populations using standard surveys; 24. Link-tracing and respondent-driven sampling; Part V. Data Collection Strategies for the Hard to Survey: 25. Use of paid media to encourage 2010 Census participation among the hard to count; 26. The hard to reach among the poor in Europe: lessons from Eurostat's EU-SILC survey in Belgium; 27. Tailored and targeted designs for hard-to-survey populations; 28. Standardization and meaning in the survey of linguistically diversified populations: insights from the ethnographic observation of linguistic minorities in 2010 Census interviews; 29. Mobilizing hard-to-survey populations to participate fully in censuses and surveys; 30. Finding the hard to reach and keeping them engaged in research.

Informations sur le produit

Titre: Hard-to-Survey Populations
Éditeur:
Code EAN: 9781107031357
ISBN: 978-1-107-03135-7
Format: Livre Relié
Editeur: Cambridge University Press
Genre: Psychologie
nombre de pages: 676
Poids: 1329g
Taille: H250mm x B175mm x T40mm
Année: 2014