Bienvenue chez nous!
Logo Ex Libris

The Young Messiah (Movie tie-in) (originally published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt)

  • Couverture cartonnée
  • 336 Nombre de pages
(0) Donner la première évaluation
Évaluations
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Afficher toutes les évaluations
Zusatztext Praise for The Young Messiah   “[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life... Lire la suite
CHF 18.50
Habituellement expédié sous 2 à 3 semaines.

Description

Zusatztext Praise for The Young Messiah   “[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God.” — Time   “Brilliant and tangible . . . [Anne] Rice retains our rapt attention.” — Los Angeles Times   “Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human.” — National Catholic Reporter   “An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus.” — The Denver Post Informationen zum Autor Anne Rice is the author of thirty-two books. She lives in Palm Desert, California. Klappentext NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE With the Holy Land in turmoil, seven-year-old Jesus and his family leave Egypt for the dangerous road home to Jerusalem. As they travel, the boy ponders the mysteries surrounding his birth. Anne Rice's dazzling, kaleidoscopic novel, based on the gospels and the most respected New Testament scholarship, summons up the voice, the presence, and the words of Jesus, allowing him to tell his own story as he struggles to grasp the holy purpose of his life. Praise for The Young Messiah "[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God."-Time "Brilliant and tangible . . . Rice retains our rapt attention."-Los Angeles Times "Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human."-National Catholic Reporter "An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus."-The Denver Post Previously published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt Zusammenfassung SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE   With the Holy Land in turmoil, seven-year-old Jesus and his family leave Egypt for the dangerous road home to Jerusalem. As they travel, the boy ponders the mysteries surrounding his birth. Anne Rice’s dazzling, kaleidoscopic novel, based on the gospels and the most respected New Testament scholarship, summons up the voice, the presence, and the words of Jesus, allowing him to tell his own story as he struggles to grasp the holy purpose of his life.   Praise for The Young Messiah   “[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God.” — Time   “Brilliant and tangible . . . Rice retains our rapt attention.” — Los Angeles Times   “Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human.” — National Catholic Reporter   “An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus.” — The Denver Post   Previously published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt ...

Praise for The Young Messiah
 
“[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God.”Time
 
“Brilliant and tangible . . . [Anne] Rice retains our rapt attention.”Los Angeles Times
 
“Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human.”National Catholic Reporter
 
“An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus.”The Denver Post

Auteur

Anne Rice is the author of thirty-two books. She lives in Palm Desert, California.



Texte du rabat

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE

With the Holy Land in turmoil, seven-year-old Jesus and his family leave Egypt for the dangerous road home to Jerusalem. As they travel, the boy ponders the mysteries surrounding his birth. Anne Rice's dazzling, kaleidoscopic novel, based on the gospels and the most respected New Testament scholarship, summons up the voice, the presence, and the words of Jesus, allowing him to tell his own story as he struggles to grasp the holy purpose of his life.

Praise for The Young Messiah

"[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God."-Time

"Brilliant and tangible . . . Rice retains our rapt attention."-Los Angeles Times

"Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human."-National Catholic Reporter

"An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus."-The Denver Post

Previously published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt



Résumé
NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE
 
With the Holy Land in turmoil, seven-year-old Jesus and his family leave Egypt for the dangerous road home to Jerusalem. As they travel, the boy ponders the mysteries surrounding his birth. Anne Rice’s dazzling, kaleidoscopic novel, based on the gospels and the most respected New Testament scholarship, summons up the voice, the presence, and the words of Jesus, allowing him to tell his own story as he struggles to grasp the holy purpose of his life.
 
Praise for The Young Messiah
 
“[An] intensely literal, historical, reverent treatment of a year in the life of Jesus, Son of God.”Time
 
“Brilliant and tangible . . . Rice retains our rapt attention.”Los Angeles Times
 
“Emotionally engaging and often moving; Ms. Rice succeeds in creating a Jesus who is recognizably human.”National Catholic Reporter
 
“An inestimably valuable contribution to the discussion of Christian history as well as a tender look at the young Jesus.”The Denver Post
 
Previously published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt

Échantillon de lecture
I WAS SEVEN YEARS OLD. What do you know when you’re seven years old? All my life, or so I thought, we’d been in the city of Alexandria, in the Street of the Carpenters, with the other Galileans, and sooner or later we were going home.
 
Late afternoon. We were playing, my gang against his, and when he ran at me again, bully that he was, bigger than me, and catching me off balance, I felt the power go out of me as I shouted: “You’ll never get where you’re going.”
 
He fell down white in the sandy earth, and they all crowded around him. The sun was hot and my chest was heaving as I looked at him. He was so limp”
 
In the snap of two fingers everyone drew back. It seemed the whole street went quiet except for the carpenters’ hammers. I’d never heard such a quiet.
 
“He’s dead!” Little Joses said. And then they all took it up. “He’s dead, he’s dead, he’s dead.”
 
I knew it was true. He was a bundle of arms and legs in the beaten dust.
 
And I was empty. The power had taken everything with it, all gone.
 
His mother came out of the house, and her scream went up the walls into a howl. From everywhere the women came running.
 
My mother lifted me off my feet. She carried me down the street and through the courtyard and into the dark of our house. All my cousins crowded in with us, and James, my big brother, pulled the curtain shut. He turned his back on the light. He said:
 
“Jesus did it. He killed him.” He was afraid.
 
“Don’t you say such a thing!” said my mother. She clutched me so close to her, I could scarcely breathe.
 
Big Joseph woke up.
 
Now Big Joseph was my father, because he was married to my mother, but I’d never called him Father. I’d been taught to call him Joseph. I didn’t know why.
 
He’d been asleep on the mat. We’d worked all day on a job in Philo’s house, and he and the rest of the men had lain down in the heat of the afternoon to sleep. He climbed to his feet.
 
“What’s that shouting outside?” he asked. “What’s happened?”
 
He looked to James. James was his eldest son. James was the son of a wife who had died before Joseph married my mother.
 
James said it again.
 
“Jesus killed Eleazer. Jesus cursed him and he fell down dead.”
 
Joseph stared at me, his face still blank from sleep. There was more and more shouting in the street. He rose to his feet, and ran his hands back through his thick curly hair.
 
My little cousins were slipping through the door one by one and crowding around us.
 
My mother was trembling. “He couldn’t have done it,” she said. “He wouldn’t do such a thing.”
 
“I saw it,” said James. “I saw it when he made the sparrows out of clay on the Sabbath. The teacher told him he shouldn’t do such things on the Sabbath. Jesus looked at the birds and they turned into real birds. They flew away. You saw it too. He killed Eleazer, Mother, I saw it.”
 
My cousins made a ring of white faces in the shadows: Little Joses, Judas, and Little Symeon and Salome, watching anxiously, afraid of being sent out. Salome was my age, and my dearest and closest. Salome was like my sister.
 
Then in came my mother’s brother Cleopas, always the talker, who was the father of these cousins, except for Big Silas who came in now, a boy older than James. He went into the corner, and then came his brother, Levi, and both wanted to see what was going on.
 
“Joseph, they’re all out there,” said Cleopas, “Jonathan bar Zakkai, and his brothers, they’re saying Jesus killed their boy. They’re envious that we got that job at Philo’s house, they’re envious that we got the other job before that, they’re envious that we’re getting more and more jobs, they’re so sure they do things better than we do—.”
 
“Is the boy dead?” Joseph said. “Or is the boy alive?”
 
Salome shot forward and whispered in my ear. “Just make him come alive, Jesus, the way you made the birds come alive!”
 
Little Symeon was giggling. He was too little to know what was going on. Little Judas knew, but he was quiet.
 
“Stop,” said James, the little boss of the children. “Salome, be quiet.”
 
I could hear them shouting in the street. I heard other noises. Stones were hitting the walls of the house. My mother started to cry.
 
“You dare do that!” shouted my uncle Cleopas and he rushed back out through the door. Joseph went after him.
 
I wriggled out of my mother’s grasp and darted out before she could catch me, and past my uncle and Joseph and right into the crowd as they were all waving and hollering and shaking their fists. I went so fast, they didn’t even see me. I was like a fish in the river. I moved in and out through people who were shouting over my head until I got to Eleazer’s house.
 
The women all had their backs to the door, and they didn’t see me as I went around the edge of the room.
 
I went right into the dark room, where they’d laid him on the mat. His mother was there leaning on her sister and sobbing.
 
There was only one lamp, very weak.
 
Eleazer was pale with his arms at his sides, same soiled tunic, and the soles of his feet very black. He was dead. His mouth was open and his white teeth showed over his lip.
 
The Greek physician came in—he was really a Jew—and he knelt down, and he looked at Eleazer and he shook his head.
 
Then he saw me and said:
 
“Out.”
 
His mother turned and she saw it was me and she screamed.
 
I bent over him:
 
“Wake up, Eleazer,” I said. “Wake up now.”
 
I reached out and laid my hand on his forehead.
 
The power went out. My eyes closed. I was dizzy. But I heard him draw in his breath.
 
His mother screamed over and over and it hurt my ears. Her sister screamed. All the women were screaming.
 
I fell back on the floor. I was weak. The Greek physician was staring down at me. I was sick. The room was dim. Other people had rushed in.
 
Eleazer came up, and he was up all knees and fists before anyone could get to him, and he set on me and punched me and hit me, and knocked my head back against the ground, and kicked me again and again:
 
“Son of David, Son of David!” he shouted, mocking me, “Son of David, Son of David!” kicking me in the face, and in the ribs, until his father grabbed him around the waist and picked him up in the air.
 
I ached all over, couldn’t breathe.
 
“Son of David!” Eleazer kept shouting.
 
Someone lifted me and carried me out of the house and into the crowd in the street. I was still gasping. I hurt all over. It seemed the whole street was screaming, worse than before, and someone said the Teacher was coming, and my uncle Cleopas was yelling in Greek at Jonathan, Eleazer’s father, and Jonathan was yelling back, and Eleazer was shouting, “Son of David, Son of David!”
 
I was in Joseph’s arms. He was trying to move, but the crowd wouldn’t let him. Cleopas was pushing at Eleazer’s father. Eleazer’s father was trying to get at Cleopas, but other men took hold of his arms. I heard Eleazer shouting far away.
 
There was the Teacher declaring: “That child’s not dead, you hush up, Eleazer, who said he was dead? Eleazer, stop shouting! Whoever could think this child is dead?”
 
“Brought him back to life, that’s what he did,” said one of theirs.
 
We were in our courtyard, the entire crowd had pushed in with us, my uncle and Eleazer’s people still screaming at each other, and the Teacher demanding order.
 
Now my uncles, Alphaeus and Simon, had come. These were Joseph’s brothers. And they’d just woken up. They put up their hands against the crowd. Their mouths were hard and their eyes were big.
 
My aunts, Salome and Esther and Mary, were there, with all the cousins running and jumping as if this were a festival, except for Silas and Levi and James who stood with the men.
 

Informations sur le produit

Titre: The Young Messiah (Movie tie-in) (originally published as Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt)
Sous-titre: A Novel
Auteur:
Code EAN: 9780399594779
ISBN: 978-0-399-59477-9
Format: Couverture cartonnée
Editeur: Random House N.Y.
Genre: Romans et récits
nombre de pages: 336
Poids: 227g
Taille: H201mm x B132mm x T18mm
Année: 2016

Évaluations

Vue d’ensemble

Mes évaluations

Évaluez cet article