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Ghost towns in England

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 33. Chapters: Deserted medieval villages in England, List of lost settlements in the United Kingdom, Ski... Weiterlesen
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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 33. Chapters: Deserted medieval villages in England, List of lost settlements in the United Kingdom, Skinnand, Imber, Oxnead, List of lost settlements in Hertfordshire, Statfold, Erringham chapel, Seacourt, Tyneham, Cuckmere Valley, Tottington, Norfolk, Hallsands, Godwick, Asterleigh, List of lost settlements in Northamptonshire, Eaton Hastings, Billingborough, List of lost settlements in Norfolk, Langford, Norfolk, Wolfhampcote, Wharram Percy, Babingley, Hound Tor, Derwent, Derbyshire, Waterton, Lincolnshire, Wykeham, Lincolnshire, Alethorpe, Stanford, Norfolk, Knaptoft, Clopton, Cambridgeshire, Sturston, Norfolk, Gainsthorpe, Cottam, East Riding of Yorkshire, Ashopton, Martinsthorpe, Ingarsby, Cestersover, Cowlam, Alton, Leicestershire, Barforth, Balsdean, Snap, Wiltshire, Upper Ditchford, Nash, Telford and Wrekin, Stretton Baskerville. Excerpt: This list of lost settlements in the United Kingdom includes deserted medieval villages (DMVs), shrunken villages, abandoned villages and other settlements known to have been lost, depopulated or significantly reduced in size over the centuries. There are estimated to be as many as 3,000 DMVs in England. Grid references are given, where known. Agden Side, near Agden Reservoir Phoside, near Glossop. Toxall near Macclesfield see also the lost villages of the Romney Marsh for more detail For former villages whose sites were in Berkshire until the 1974 county boundary changes please see the Berkshire section, above. Monmouthshire Skinnand is a deserted medieval village in Lincolnshire. Originally a small farming community situated 9 miles (14 km) south of Lincoln and 11.5 miles (19 km) northwest of Sleaford, it once boasted a church and several houses. It was hit hard, however, by the English Civil War of 1642-1646, when the church fell into ruins. Today only fields and one deserted farmhouse remain of the once thriving community. Archaeological investigations in the area around Skinnand indicate the countryside was occupied from at least the Bronze Age, in about 600 BC. The remains of Iron Age farms have been found at nearby Navenby, 2.5 miles (4 km) west of Skinnand, as well as Bronze Age and Roman remains. Skinnand was recorded as "Schinende" in the Domesday Book of 1086, a name thought to be of Anglo-Saxon origin. Historians believe the original name may have come from the Old Scandinavian word "skinnari," which means "skinner or tanner." The ancient parish of Skinnand was recorded as the smallest village in the Deanery of Longoboby in 1332. It had the lowest tax assessment, a population of around 40 and was predominantly based around agriculture. The population of Skinnand stayed stable for many generations but, by 1563, only three of the original ten households remained. This decrease in numbers has been attributed, by some historians, to a reduction in arab

Produktinformationen

Titel: Ghost towns in England
Untertitel: Deserted medieval villages in England, List of lost settlements in the United Kingdom, Skinnand, Imber, Oxnead, List of lost settlements in Hertfordshire, Statfold, Erringham chapel, Seacourt, Tyneham, Cuckmere Valley, Tottington, Norfolk
Editor:
EAN: 9781156981344
ISBN: 978-1-156-98134-4
Format: Kartonierter Einband
Herausgeber: Books on Demand
Anzahl Seiten: 34
Gewicht: 87g
Größe: H2mm x B246mm x T189mm
Jahr: 2012