Willkommen, schön sind Sie da!
Logo Ex Libris

The Form of Information in Science

  • Kartonierter Einband
  • 616 Seiten
(0) Erste Bewertung abgeben
Bewertungen
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Alle Bewertungen ansehen
DOES DISCOURSE HAVE A 'STRUCTURE'? HARRIS'S REVOLUTION IN LINGUISTICS As a freshman back in 1947 I discovered that ... Weiterlesen
CHF 264.00
Print on Demand - Auslieferung erfolgt in der Regel innert 4 bis 6 Wochen.
Bestellung & Lieferung in eine Filiale möglich

Beschreibung

DOES DISCOURSE HAVE A 'STRUCTURE'? HARRIS'S REVOLUTION IN LINGUISTICS As a freshman back in 1947 I discovered that within the various academic divisions and subdivisions of the University of Pennsylvania there existed a something (it was not a Department, but a piece of the Anthropology Department) called 'Linguistic Analysis'. I was an untalented but enthusiastic student of Greek and a slightly more talented student of German, as well as the son of a translator, so the idea of 'Linguistic Analysis' attracted me, sight unseen, and I signed up for a course. It turned out that 'Linguistic Analysis' was essentially a graduate program - I and another undergraduate called Noam Chomsky were the only two undergraduates who took courses in Linguistic Analysis - and also that it was essentially a one-man show: a professor named Zellig Harris taught all the courses with the aid of graduate Teaching Fellows (and possibly - I am not sure - one Assistant Professor). The technicalities of Linguistic Analysis were formidable, and I never did master them all. But the powerful intellect and personality of Zellig Harris drew me like a lodestone, and, although I majored in Philosophy, I took every course there was to take in Linguistic Analysis from then until my gradua tion. What 'Linguistics' was like before Zellig Harris is something not many people care to remember today.

Autorentext
Paul Mattick, geboren 1944, ist prominenter Kunstkritiker und Professor für Philosophie an der Adelphi University in New York.

Klappentext

DOES DISCOURSE HAVE A 'STRUCTURE'? HARRIS'S REVOLUTION IN LINGUISTICS As a freshman back in 1947 I discovered that within the various academic divisions and subdivisions of the University of Pennsylvania there existed a something (it was not a Department, but a piece of the Anthropology Department) called 'Linguistic Analysis'. I was an untalented but enthusiastic student of Greek and a slightly more talented student of German, as well as the son of a translator, so the idea of 'Linguistic Analysis' attracted me, sight unseen, and I signed up for a course. It turned out that 'Linguistic Analysis' was essentially a graduate program - I and another undergraduate called Noam Chomsky were the only two undergraduates who took courses in Linguistic Analysis - and also that it was essentially a one-man show: a professor named Zellig Harris taught all the courses with the aid of graduate Teaching Fellows (and possibly - I am not sure - one Assistant Professor). The technicalities of Linguistic Analysis were formidable, and I never did master them all. But the powerful intellect and personality of Zellig Harris drew me like a lodestone, and, although I majored in Philosophy, I took every course there was to take in Linguistic Analysis from then until my gradua­ tion. What 'Linguistics' was like before Zellig Harris is something not many people care to remember today.



Inhalt

1 / Reducing Texts to Formulas.- 1. Seeking Canonical Forms.- 2. Analysis of Word Combinations.- 2.1. Grammatical Analysis.- 2.2. Sublanguage Classes and Sentence Structures.- 2.3. Sublanguage Subclasses.- 2.4. The Tables.- 2.5. Validity of the Procedures.- 3. Details of the Analysis.- 3.1. Word Combination within Segments.- 3.2. Obtaining Repeating Types of Sentences.- 3.3. How Much Transformation?.- 3.4. Summary of Procedures of Analysis.- 3.5. Output.- 2 /Result: Formulas of Information.- 1. Meta-science Segments.- 2. Word Classes.- 3. Word Subclasses.- 4. Word Modifiers and Local Operators.- 5. Summary of Word Classes.- 6. Sentence Types.- 7. Sentence Formulas.- 3 / From Structure to Information.- 1. Differences in Structure and Differences in Information.- 1.1. Course of the Information.- 1.2. Changes in Word Classes.- 1.3. Changes in Sentence-types.- 1.4. Critique of the Sentence-types.- 2. Formula-based Critique of Information.- 3. Sublanguage Properties.- 3.1. Grammatical Structure.- 3.2. Discourse Structure.- 3.3. Information Processing.- 4. Further Work.- 5. Toward the Grammar of Science.- 4 / Sublanguage Formulas as Information Units.- 1. Normal Form Linearity: Projection and the Use of the Arrow.- 2. Local Operator Modifiers.- 2.1. Modifiers of Argument (Noun) Categories.- 2.2. Referential Superscripts.- 2.3. Modifiers of Operator Categories.- 3. The Classifier 'Response'.- 4. Correlations between W and V Operators.- 5. Sublanguage Homonymities.- 6. Extending Sublanguage Grammar.- 7. Information Structure and the 'r' Operator.- 5 / The Apparatus of Sublanguage Transformations.- 1. A Preliminary Survey of Sublanguage Transformations.- 2. Relinearization.- 3. Reconstruction of Repetitional Zeroing.- 3.1. Parallel-zeroing and End-zeroing.- 3.2. Subject Zeroing.- 4. Reconstruction of Low-information Zeroing.- 4.1. Broad Selection Words.- 4.2. Strong Selection Zeroing.- 4.3. Constants.- 4.4. Reconstruction of Sublanguage Appropriate Zeroings.- 5. Relative Clause.- 5.1. Representation and Reading in the Tables.- 5.2. Reductions Associated with Relative Clause.- 6. Larger Transformations.- 6.1. Denominalization.- 6.2. Passive.- 6.3 Causative.- 7. Comparative.- 8. Quantifiers and the Negative.- 9. Further Regularization.- 6 / Extending the Analysis: The Informational Environment of the Science Sentences.- 1. Introduction.- 2. Word Classes and Sentence Types.- 2.1. Elementary Fact Sentences.- 2.2. Quantity Sentences.- 2.3. Science Fact Relations.- 2.4. Metascience Operators and Arguments.- 3. Conclusions.- 7 / Information Units in a French Corpus.- 1. Information Grammar as a Pattern-matcher on Sentences and Linearization Rules to Produce Sentences from Informational Units.- 2. An Applicative Grammar of Informational Units.- 2.1. How the Construction of Categories from Word Class Combinations, in Sentences in Scientific Texts, Expresses Both the Specificity of Word Use in That Domain and a Notion of Correctness in Information Units.- 2.2. The Contextual Meaning of Words in Sentences Is Accounted for by Deterministic Categories in Units.- 2.3. The Applicative Status of Categories and the Applicative Structure of Units.- 2.4. Applicative Structure of a Unit and Linearizations.- 3. Using the Grammar of Informational Units as a Pattern-matcher for a Direct Recognition of Informational Units.- 3.1. Avoiding Preliminary Transformations on the Structure of Sentences, and Operations from Sentence Structure to Unit Structure.- 3.2. Getting a List of Categories from a Surface Structure and Matching a Unit on It.- 3.3. Recovering Implicit Information.- 4. Linearization Rules: Producing Sentences Out of Units.- 4.1. Linearization Rules and the Applicative Status of Informational Categories.- 4.2. Organization of the Dictionary of Informational Categories.- 5. Questions Which Are Not Fully Treated Here.- 6. Conclusion and Applications of the Method Presented Here.- 8 / The Cellular Source of Antibody: A Review.- 1. Background.- 2. Early Observations and Experiments on the Macrophage in Relation to Antibody Formation.- 3. Early Studies on the Lymphatic System in the Production of Antibodies.- 4. Lymphocyte or Plasma Cell as the Antibody-synthesizing Cell.- 5. Correlation of Tissue-extract Antibody with Microscopic Observations.- 6. Extraction of Cells.- 7. Release of Antibody from Tissues and from Cells Cultivated in Vitro.- 8. Studies Involving Aggregation of Bacterial Cells Around Tissue Cells.- 9. Histochemical Staining for Nucleic Acid in Lymph Nodes in Relation to Formation of Antibodies.- 10. Fluorescence Staining for Antibody.- 11. Transfer of Cells of Lymph Nodes, Lymph and Spleen.- 12. Resolution of the Problem: Electron Microscopic Studies of Antibody-producing Cells.- Appendix 1 / Tables of Immunology Reports: English.- Appendix 2 / Tables of Immunology Reports: French.- Appendix 3 / Notes to the Tables of the English Articles.- List of Symbols.

Produktinformationen

Titel: The Form of Information in Science
Untertitel: Analysis of an Immunology Sublanguage
Autor:
EAN: 9789401077774
ISBN: 9401077770
Format: Kartonierter Einband
Herausgeber: Springer Netherlands
Anzahl Seiten: 616
Gewicht: 920g
Größe: H235mm x B155mm x T32mm
Jahr: 2011
Auflage: 1989

Weitere Produkte aus der Reihe "Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science"