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1863 in the United States

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 105. Chapters: Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, False Claims Act, Chattanooga Campaign... Weiterlesen
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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 105. Chapters: Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, False Claims Act, Chattanooga Campaign, Siege of Port Hudson, Battle of Gettysburg, First Day, Battle of Missionary Ridge, Bear River Massacre, Pickett's Charge, Little Round Top, Battle of Lookout Mountain, Troop engagements of the American Civil War, 1863, Morgan's Raid, New York City draft riots, Steele's Bayou Expedition, Battle of Cape Girardeau, Battle of Wauhatchie, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, Battle of Salineville, Battle of the Cumberland Gap, Battle of Mine Run, Enrollment Act, Wheeler's October 1863 Raid, Battle of Wassaw Sound, Battle of Chalk Bluff, United States House Select Committee on an Alleged Abstraction of a Report from the Clerk's Office, Grierson's Raid, Nome Cult Trail, Battle of Galveston, Battle of Whitestone Hill, Battle of Boonsboro, Battle of Bulltown, Battle of Franklin's Crossing, Battle of Devil's Backbone, Southern Bread Riots, Second Battle of Chattanooga, Barnum's Aquarial Gardens, Battle of Big Mound, Battle of Bayou Fourche, Detroit Race Riot, Battle of Dead Buffalo Lake, Mud March, Battle of Stony Lake. Excerpt: The Battle of Chancellorsville was a major battle of the American Civil War, and the principal engagement of the Chancellorsville Campaign. It was fought from April 30 to May 6, 1863, in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, near the village of Chancellorsville. Two related battles were fought nearby on May 3 in the vicinity of Fredericksburg. The campaign pitted Union Army Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker's Army of the Potomac against an army half its size, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. Chancellorsville is known as Lee's "perfect battle" because his risky decision to divide his army in the presence of a much larger enemy force resulted in a significant Confederate victory. The victory, a product of Lee's audacity and Hooker's timid combat performance, was tempered by heavy casualties and the mortal wounding of Lt. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson to friendly fire, a loss that Lee likened to "losing my right arm." The Chancellorsville Campaign began with the crossing of the Rappahannock River by the Union army on the morning of April 27, 1863. Union cavalry under Maj. Gen. George Stoneman began a long distance raid against Lee's supply lines at about the same time. This operation was completely ineffectual. Crossing the Rapidan River via Germanna and Ely's Fords, the Federal infantry concentrated near Chancellorsville on April 30. Combined with the Union force facing Fredericksburg, Hooker planned a double envelopment, attacking Lee from both his front and rear. On May 1, Hooker advanced from Chancellorsville toward Lee, but the Confederate general split his army in the face of superior numbers, leaving a small force at Fredericksburg to deter Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick from advancing, while he attacked Hooker's advance with about 4/5ths of his army. Despite the objections of his subordinates, Hooker withdrew his men to the defensive lines around Chancellorsville, ceding the initiative to Lee. On May 2, Lee divided his army again, sending Stonewall Jack

Produktinformationen

Titel: 1863 in the United States
Untertitel: Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, False Claims Act, Chattanooga Campaign, Siege of Port Hudson, Battle of Gettysburg, First Day, Battle of Missionary Ridge, Bear River Massacre, Pickett's Charge, Little Round Top
Editor:
EAN: 9781156150573
ISBN: 1156150574
Format: Kartonierter Einband
Genre: Geschichte
Anzahl Seiten: 108
Gewicht: 404g
Größe: H246mm x B189mm x T6mm
Jahr: 2011