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1862 establishments

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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 54. Chapters: Baker County, Oregon, Wasatch County, Utah, Umatilla County, Oregon, Morgan County, Utah,... Weiterlesen
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Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 54. Chapters: Baker County, Oregon, Wasatch County, Utah, Umatilla County, Oregon, Morgan County, Utah, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, Union County, South Dakota, Cross County, Arkansas, Woodruff County, Arkansas, Lyon County, Kansas, Kendall County, Texas, Streetcars in Washington, D.C., Emory and Henry College Hospital, Nevada State Prison, American Bureau of Shipping, University of Pennsylvania Glee Club, Melbourne Zoo, Fort Douglas, Utah, Russian State Library, Big Bug, Arizona, City of Wyndham, City of Whittlesea, Chimay Brewery, Flagstaff Gardens, Denver Mint, Lee & Shepard, Southern Cross of Honor, Bulgarian Legion, Bradshaw Trail, St Michael's Cemetery, Sheffield, Birmingham Children's Hospital, MIT Libraries, Fort Halleck, Barnum's Aquarial Gardens, Chimborazo Park, Sokol Auditorium, Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron, Naval and Military Club, Fort Ruby, Satterlee Hospital, National Archaeological Museum, York U.S. Army Hospital, Freedman's Hospital, The Metropole Theatre, Kyoto Shugoshoku, New Camp Carleton, Honduran peso, Austrian Alpine Club, Bloemenmarkt, Lombardy-Venetia florin, Fairmount Township, New Jersey, Chichele Professor of Modern History. Excerpt: For just under 100 years, between 1862 and 1962, streetcars in Washington, D.C. transported people across the city and region. The first streetcars in Washington D.C. were drawn by horses and carried people short distances on flat terrain; but the introduction of cleaner and faster electric streetcars, capable of climbing steeper inclines, opened up the hilly suburbs north of the old city and in Anacostia. Several of the District's streetcar lines were extended into Maryland, and two Virginia lines crossed into the District. For a brief time, the city experimented with cable cars, but by the beginning of the 20th century, the streetcar system was fully electrified. A bit later, the extensive mergers dubbed the "Great Streetcar Consolidation" gathered most local transit firms into two major companies. In 1933, all streetcars were brought under one company, Capital Transit. The streetcars began to scale back with the rising popularity of the automobile and pressure to switch to buses. After a strike in 1955, the company changed ownership and became DC Transit, with explicit instructions to switch to buses. The system was dismantled in the early 1960s and the last streetcar ran on January 28, 1962. Today streetcars, car barns, trackage, stations and right-of way of the system still exists in various states of usage. Public transportation began in Washington, D.C. almost as soon as the city was founded. In May 1800, two-horse stage coaches began running twice daily from Bridge and High Streets NW (now Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW) in Georgetown by way of M Street NW and Pennsylvania Avenue NW/SE to William Tunnicliff's Tavern at the site now occupied by the Supreme Court Building. Service ended soon after it began. The next attempt at public transit arrived in the spring of 1830, when Gilbert Vanderwerken's Omnibuses, horse-drawn wagons, began running from Georgetown to the Navy Yard. The company maintained stables on M Street NW. These lines were later extended dow

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Titel: 1862 establishments
Untertitel: Baker County, Oregon, Wasatch County, Utah, Umatilla County, Oregon, Morgan County, Utah, Minnehaha County, South Dakota, Union County, South Dakota, Cross County, Arkansas, Woodruff County, Arkansas, Lyon County, Kansas, Kendall County
Editor:
EAN: 9781156150467
ISBN: 1156150469
Format: Kartonierter Einband
Anzahl Seiten: 56
Gewicht: 699g
Größe: H246mm x B189mm x T3mm
Jahr: 2011