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Transparent Conductive Materials

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Edited by well-known pioneers in the field, this handbook and ready reference provides a comprehensive overview of transparent con... Weiterlesen
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Beschreibung

Edited by well-known pioneers in the field, this handbook and ready reference provides a comprehensive overview of transparent conductive materials with a strong application focus.
Following an introduction to the materials and recent developments, subsequent chapters discuss the synthesis and characterization as well as the deposition techniques that are commonly used for energy harvesting and light emitting applications. Finally, the book concludes with a look at future technological advances.
All-encompassing and up-to-date, this interdisciplinary text runs the gamut from chemistry and materials science to engineering, from academia to industry, and from fundamental challenges to readily available applications.

David Levy is research professor and head of the Sol-Gel Group at the Materials Science Institute of Madrid (ICMM) of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas. His research interests are optical materials, liquid crystal materials, Sol-Gel processing and their applications. During his time at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem David Levy pioneered the sol-gel process for the preparation of organically doped silica-gel glasses. He has more than 130 publications and a number of patents to his name and has received numerous prizes in recognition of his work on sol-gel materials, including the First Ulrich Prize and the nomination to King Juan Carlos-I research award. David Levy also headed the LINES of the National Institute of Aerospace Technology, INTA, where he developed space materials, instrumentation and micro/nanotechnologies for space to be implemented on the board of a satellite.
Erick Castellon is professor and researcher in physical and materials chemistry at School of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Engineering (CICIMA), University of Costa Rica. He obtained his PhD in 2011 at the Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, performing his research in the Institute of Materials Science in Madrid under the advice of David Levy and Marcos Zayat. His main research interests include chemistry of materials with photonic applications, liquid crystals and porous materials with emphasis on hybrid organic-inorganic materials obtained by the sol-gel technique.

Autorentext
David Levy is research professor and head of the Sol-Gel Group at the Materials Science Institute of Madrid (ICMM) of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas. His research interests are optical materials, liquid crystal materials, Sol-Gel processing and their applications. During his time at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem David Levy pioneered the sol-gel process for the preparation of organically doped silica-gel glasses. He has more than 130 publications and a number of patents to his name and has received numerous prizes in recognition of his work on sol-gel materials, including the First Ulrich Prize and the nomination to King Juan Carlos-I research award. David Levy also headed the LINES of the National Institute of Aerospace Technology, INTA, where he developed space materials, instrumentation and micro/nanotechnologies for space to be implemented on the board of a satellite.
Erick Castellon is professor and researcher in physical and materials chemistry at School of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Engineering (CICIMA), University of Costa Rica. He obtained his PhD in 2011 at the Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, performing his research in the Institute of Materials Science in Madrid under the advice of David Levy and Marcos Zayat. His main research interests include chemistry of materials with photonic applications, liquid crystals and porous materials with emphasis on hybrid organic-inorganic materials obtained by the sol-gel technique.

Inhalt

Preface xi

Part I Electrical Conductive Materials: General Aspects 1

1.1 The Compromise Between Conductivity and Transparency 3
Alicia de Andrés, Félix Jiménez-Villacorta, and Carlos Prieto

1.1.1 Introduction 3

1.1.2 Relevant Parameters for Transparent Electrodes 5

1.1.2.1 Transmittance 5

1.1.2.2 Transmittance and Absorption Coefficient: Experimental Aspects 6

1.1.2.3 Electronic Transport Parameters 7

1.1.2.4 Figure of Merit 9

1.1.3 Spectroscopies 11

1.1.3.1 Raman and Infrared Spectroscopies 11

1.1.3.2 X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies 13

1.1.3.3 UPS and XPS 15

1.1.4 Transparent Conducting Materials 17

1.1.4.1 Oxide Electrodes: Amorphous Films 17

1.1.4.2 Metallic Nanowires and Grids 18

1.1.4.3 Graphene and Graphene Oxide 19

1.1.4.4 Graphene Doping with Atoms and Nanoparticles 21

1.1.5 Conclusions and Forecast 24

References 25

Part II Inorganic Conductive Materials 31

2.1 Metallic Oxides (ITO, ZnO, SnO2, TiO2) 33
Klaus Ellmer, RainaldMientus, and Stefan Seeger

2.1.1 Introduction 33

2.1.2 Basic Bulk Properties 35

2.1.2.1 ITO 38

2.1.2.1.1 Crystallographic Structure 38

2.1.2.1.2 Electrical Properties 39

2.1.2.1.3 Optical Properties 40

2.1.2.2 ZnO 42

2.1.2.2.1 Crystallographic Structure 43

2.1.2.2.2 Electrical Properties 44

2.1.2.2.3 Optical Properties 46

2.1.2.3 SnO2 47

2.1.2.3.1 Crystallographic Structure 48

2.1.2.3.2 Electrical Properties 48

2.1.2.3.3 Optical Properties 48

2.1.2.4 TiO2 50

2.1.2.4.1 Crystallographic Structure 50

2.1.2.4.2 Electrical Properties 53

2.1.2.4.3 Optical Properties 55

2.1.3 Thin Film Properties 57

2.1.3.1 ITO 57

2.1.3.2 ZnO 59

2.1.3.3 SnO2 60

2.1.3.4 TiO2 63

2.1.4 Conclusions 67

References 68

2.2 Chemical Bath Deposition 81
Peter Fuchs, Yaroslav E. Romanyuk, and Ayodhya N. Tiwari

2.2.1 Introduction 81

2.2.2 Principles of Chemical Bath Deposition 81

2.2.3 Material Examples 82

2.2.3.1 ZnO 82

2.2.3.2 SnO2 90

2.2.3.3 In2O3 92

2.2.3.4 CdO 93

2.2.4 Low-temperature Post-deposition Treatment 93

2.2.5 Implementation of CBD TCOs in Devices 94

2.2.6 Conclusions and Outlook 96

References 97

2.3 Metal Nanowires 105
Chao Chen and Changhui Ye

2.3.1 Synthesis of Metal Nanowires 108

2.3.2 Fabrication of Transparent Conductive Films on the Basis of Metal Nanowires 110

2.3.3 PatterningMetal Nanowire Transparent Conductive Films 112

2.3.4 Performance of Metal Nanowire Transparent Conductive Films 114

2.3.4.1 Transparency and Conductivity 115

2.3.4.2 Haze Factor 117

2.3.4.3 Color 119

2.3.4.4 Uniformity 120

2.3.4.5 Roughness 121

2.3.4.6 Adhesiveness 123

2.3.4.7 Stability 124

2.3.5 Concluding Remarks 126

References 127

Part III Organic Conductive Materials 133

3.1 Carbon Nanotubes 135
Félix Salazar-Bloise

3.1.1 Introduction 135

3.1.2 Some Simple Carbon Structures 136

3.1.3 Graphene in the Context of Nanotubes 137

3.1.4 Fundamentals of Nanotubes 142

3.1.4.1 Structure of Carbon Nanotubes 142

3.1.4.2 Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes 146

3.1.5 Mechanical Properties 151

3.1.6 Thermal Properties 152

3.1.7 Some Techniques for Producing Nanotubes 155

3.1.7.1 Arc-discharge Method 155

3.1.7.2 Laser Ablation 156

3.1.7.3 Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) 156

References 156

3.2 Graphene 165
Judy Z.Wu

3.2.1 Introduction 165

3.2.2 Physical Properties of Intrinsic Graphene Transparent Conductors (GTCs) 167

3.2.3 Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene Transparent Conductors 169

3.2.3.1 Synthesis of Graphene 169

3.2.3.1.1 Solution Synthesis of Graphene 169

3.2.3.1.2 Chemical Vapor Deposition of Graphene on Metal Foils 170

3.2.3.1.3 Direct Growth of Graphene on Dielectric Substrates 171

3.2.3.2 Characterization of GTC Properties 174

3.2.3.3 GTC Interface with Other Materials in Heterostructures 175

3.2.3.3.1 EngineeringWork Function of Graphene 175

3.2.3.3.2 Efficient Charge Transfer Across van derWaals Heterojunction Interface 176

3.2.4 Applications of Graphene Transparent Conductors 178

3.2.4.1 Photodetectors 178

3.2.4.2 Photovoltaics 180

3.2.4.2.1 Dye Sensitizer Solar Cells on GTC 180

3.2.4.2.2 Organic Solar Cells on GTC 181

3.2.4.2.3 Inorganic PV...

Produktinformationen

Titel: Transparent Conductive Materials
Untertitel: Materials, Synthesis, Characterization, Applications
Autor:
Editor:
EAN: 9783527804634
Digitaler Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM
Format: E-Book (pdf)
Hersteller: Wiley-VCH
Genre: Chemie
Anzahl Seiten: 362
Veröffentlichung: 25.10.2018
Dateigrösse: 20.7 MB