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Navigation by Judgment

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Foreign aid organizations collectively spend hundreds of billions of dollars annually, with mixed results. Part of the problem in... Weiterlesen
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Beschreibung

Foreign aid organizations collectively spend hundreds of billions of dollars annually, with mixed results. Part of the problem in these endeavors lies in their execution. When should foreign aid organizations empower actors on the front lines of delivery to guide aid interventions, and when should distant headquarters lead? In Navigation by Judgment, Dan Honig argues that high-quality implementation of foreign aid programs often requires contextual information that cannot be seen by those in distant headquarters. Tight controls and a focus on reaching pre-set measurable targets often prevent front-line workers from using skill, local knowledge, and creativity to solve problems in ways that maximize the impact of foreign aid. Drawing on a novel database of over 14,000 discrete development projects across nine aid agencies and eight paired case studies of development projects, Honig concludes that aid agencies will often benefit from giving field agents the authority to use their own judgments to guide aid delivery. This "navigation by judgment" is particularly valuable when environments are unpredictable and when accomplishing an aid program's goals is hard to accurately measure. Highlighting a crucial obstacle for effective global aid, Navigation by Judgment shows that the management of aid projects matters for aid effectiveness.



Autorentext

Dan Honig is an Assistant Professor of International Development at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). His research focuses on the relationship between organizational structure, management practice, and performance in developing country governments and foreign aid agencies. Honig has held a variety of positions outside of the academy. He served as special assistant and an advisor to successive ministers of finance in Liberia; ran an NGO focused on youth entrepreneurship in agriculture in East Timor; and has worked for local and international organizations in a number of developing countries. A proud Michigander, he holds a BA from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from Harvard's Kennedy School.



Inhalt

Preface Acknowledgments Part I: The What, Why, and When of Navigation by Judgment Chapter 1. Introduction - The Management of Foreign Aid Chapter 2. When to Let Go: The Costs and Benefits of Navigation by Judgment Chapter 3. Agents - Who Does the Judging? Chapter 4. Authorizing Environments & the Perils of Legitimacy Seeking Part II: How Does Navigation by Judgment Fare in Practice? Chapter 5. How to Know What Works Better, When: Data, Methods, and Empirical Operationalization Chapter 6. Journey Without Maps - Environmental Unpredictability and Navigation Strategy Chapter 7. Tailoring Management to Suit the Task - Project Verifiability and Navigation Strategy Part III: Implications Chapter 8. Delegation and Control Revisited Chapter 9. Conclusion - Implications for the Aid Industry & Beyond Appendices Appendix I: Data Collection Appendix II: Additional Econometric Analysis Bibliography

Produktinformationen

Titel: Navigation by Judgment
Untertitel: Why and When Top Down Management of Foreign Aid Doesn't Work
Autor:
EAN: 9780190672461
Digitaler Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM
Format: E-Book (pdf)
Hersteller: Oxford University Press
Genre: Politikwissenschaft
Anzahl Seiten: 240
Veröffentlichung: 29.03.2018
Dateigrösse: 14.4 MB