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Nineteenth-Century Ireland (New Gill History of Ireland 5)

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Nineteenth-century Ireland began and ended in armed revolt. The bloody insurrections of 1798 were the proximate reasons for the pa... Weiterlesen
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Beschreibung

Nineteenth-century Ireland began and ended in armed revolt. The bloody insurrections of 1798 were the proximate reasons for the passing of the Act of Union two years later. The 'long nineteenth century' lasted until 1922, by which the institutions of modern Ireland were in place against a background of the Great War, the Ulster rebellion and the armed uprising of the nationalist Ireland. The hope was that, in an imperial structure, the ethnic, religious and national differences of the inhabitants of Ireland could be reconciled and eliminated. The search for stability proved elusive. Nationalist Ireland mobilised a mass democratic movement under Daniel O'Connell to secure Catholic Emancipation before seeing its world transformed by the social cataclysm of the Great Irish Potato Famine. At the same time, the Protestant north-east of Ulster was feeling the first benefits of the Industrial Revolution. Although post-Famine Ireland modernised rapidly, only the north-east had a modern economy. The mixture of Protestantism and manufacturing industry integrated into the greater United Kingdom and gave a new twist to the traditional Irish Protestant hostility to Catholic political demands. In the home rule period from the 1880s to 1914, the prospect of partition moved from being almost unthinkable to being almost inevitable.Nineteenth-century Ireland collapsed in the various wars and rebellions of 1912-22. Like many other parts of Europe than and since, it had proved that an imperial superstructure can contain domestic ethnic rivalries, but cannot always eliminate them.

Autorentext

Professor D. George Boyce is a graduate of Queen's University Belfast. He was an archivist in the Department of Western Manuscripts, Bodleian Library Oxford between 1968 and 1971, and then lectured in the Department of Politics and International relations in Swansea University from 1971 until 2004. A fellow of the Royal Historical Society, he has written books and articles on modern British, Irish, imperial and military history and politics, including Nationalism in Ireland, Decolonisation and the British Empire and The Falklands War.



Klappentext

The elusive search for stability is the subject of Professor D. George Boyce's Nineteenth-Century Ireland, the fifth in the New Gill History of Ireland series. Nineteenth-century Ireland began and ended in armed revolt. The bloody insurrections of 1798 were the proximate reasons for the passing of the Act of Union two years later. The 'long nineteenth century' lasted until 1922, by which the institutions of modern Ireland were in place against a background of the Great War, the Ulster rebellion and the armed uprising of the nationalist Ireland. The hope was that, in an imperial structure, the ethnic, religious and national differences of the inhabitants of Ireland could be reconciled and eliminated. Nationalist Ireland mobilised a mass democratic movement under Daniel O'Connell to secure Catholic Emancipation before seeing its world transformed by the social cataclysm of the Great Irish Potato Famine. At the same time, the Protestant north-east of Ulster was feeling the first benefits of the Industrial Revolution. Although post-Famine Ireland modernised rapidly, only the north-east had a modern economy. The mixture of Protestantism and manufacturing industry integrated into the greater United Kingdom and gave a new twist to the traditional Irish Protestant hostility to Catholic political demands. In the home rule period from the 1880s to 1914, the prospect of partition moved from being almost unthinkable to being almost inevitable. Nineteenth-century Ireland collapsed in the various wars and rebellions of 1912-22. Like many other parts of Europe than and since, it had proved that an imperial superstructure can contain domestic ethnic rivalries, but cannot always eliminate them.

    Introduction
  1. The Union: Prelude and Aftermath, 1798-1808
  2. The Catholic Question and Protestant Answers, 1808-29
  3. Testing the Union, 1830-45
  4. The Land and its Nemesis, 1845-9
  5. Political Diversity, Religious Division, 1850-69
  6. The Shaping of Irish Politics (1): The Making of Irish Nationalism, 1870-91
  7. The Shaping of Irish Politics (2): The Making of Irish Unionism, 1870-93
  8. From Conciliation to Confrontation, 1891-1914
  9. Modernising Ireland, 1834-1914
  10. The Union Broken, 1914-23
  11. Stability and Strife in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Produktinformationen

Titel: Nineteenth-Century Ireland (New Gill History of Ireland 5)
Untertitel: The Search for Stability in the 'Long Nineteenth Century' - The 1798 Rebellion, the Great Potato Famine, the Easter Rising and the Partition of Ireland
Autor:
EAN: 9780717160969
ISBN: 978-0-7171-6096-9
Digitaler Kopierschutz: Adobe-DRM
Format: E-Book (epub)
Herausgeber: Gill Books
Genre: Geschichte
Anzahl Seiten: 435
Veröffentlichung: 27.09.2005
Jahr: 2005
Untertitel: Englisch
Dateigrösse: 1.1 MB
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